Tag Archives: lair of grievous

What Would Go Into a Star Wars Haunted House…

So Halloween’s tomorrow, and of course I’m excited! I think the majority of us Star Wars fans are. Candy, kids (I love door-greeting), and costumes! (Oh, and pretty much anything to do with pumpkins) Some of my favorite things year-round are center stage this time of year! Now I’ll be honest… I don’t care too much for the “spooky” side of Halloween; I mean, I really don’t care for horror movies and gore, is that so weird? I’m scared enough by some of the yard decorations people put up. But I do like parodies and “fun-spooky” stuff, if that makes any sense. Let’s just say I like movies best when good guys win and bad guys don’t terrify me to the point of covering my eyes. And as you all know, I love the SW movies and shows. So… how is it I could come up with a whole post’s worth of ideas for a Star Warsian Haunted House?
Well, part of the reason is thanks to my cousin’s boyfriend, who is a master at scaring people and runs haunted houses every so often. Oh, the hilarious stories he’s told of making grown men cry… XD So that’s partially inspired me here. Plus, there are situations, creatures, people, and places that would make any of us scream and freak out if we were there in our heroes’ shoes. I mean, when I watch Episode II, I delight in watching Anakin, Obi-Wan, and Padme taking on those monsters on Geonosis. But if I were there? The nexu would’ve killed me in about three seconds (I’m in decent shape, but I am not a fast runner), if it hadn’t, I would’ve been screaming the whole time. But that’s why they’re the Jedi and the super-strong politician and I’m not. And hey, now that Disney own Lucasfilm, maybe they could do something like this for their Halloween festivities at the parks! So I’ve taken the time to visualize what a super-cool, super-creepy, and super-fun SW Haunted House would look like! My recommendation is to turn the lights on if you haven’t already, because it’s about to get spooky up in here… O.O
NOTE: Contains spoilers from Episode I, Episode II, Episode III, Episode IV, Episode V, Episode VI, and the Clone Wars episodes Lair of Grievous, Cat And Mouse, Legacy of Terror, Brain Invaders, and Witches Of The Mist.
So imagine this: you walk in, and it’s dark and dusty…
It’s Palpatine’s office. As you all know, it has big windows, very red, contemporary-ish. A lot of SW heroes have walked in there, not knowing the horrific truth of the old man in the big chair… but no one’s been in here for like, ever. And the lights are long gone, with only the flickering lights of Coruscant traffic to see by. If some form of spiders exist in the SW Universe, they’ve probably weaved their webs all over the place (Admiral Trench, perhaps? :lol:). Perhaps the window’s still broken from where a long-ago struggle took place? You feel a chill, but you’re not sure if it’s the wind coming through the hole in the window or if it’s your own fear…
You tell yourself that there’s nothing to be afraid of, and you decide to walk (ratherly quickly) down a strange hallway that you, as the SW superfan you are, know was never there… and you walk right smack into a freaky statue, hidden in the shadows. Of some gaunt-looking alien. In fact, there are a lot of these statues. You wince at this, seeing that the fellow wasn’t the most friendly or jovial sort. But then you see… a bunch of masks. Old, dusty, still untouched for the most part… and the strange thing could only belong to GENERAL GRIEVOUS! As soon as you realize that somehow you’ve wandered into Grievous’ lair, you want to get out. Was that an old dismembered robotic hand of his laying in the foyer, one he lost when Kit Fisto had entered in? Sheesh, the kaladeesh could’ve stood to clean up around here. But you, having seen the TCW episode Lair Of Grievous, know that there’s a trapdoor somewhere around here, and you do NOT want to fall down it. So now you’re torn between running for your life or walking carefully to avoid said trap. You have a seriously bad feeling about this… but all the same…
YOU RUN.
After running for a bit, trying to find an exit, the ground suddenly falls out from under you. You fear the worst, that a boiling red pit awaits you. Oh, but it is so much worse…
You’ve suddenly fallen into the Death Star trash compactor.
The very thing that gave SW fans everywhere clastrophobia. It’s old, untouched, and not moving. But aside from the fact it smells more rank than usual, you flinch at the slightest creaking sound. And oh yeahhhh there might be… something… in the sludgy water. It’s dark; you can’t see anything up there, so against your better judgement, you hold your breath and dive under, hoping a vicious dianoga doesn’t await you.
Down there, the water seems strangely clearer; still murky, but it doesn’t seem to be trashy and gross. But that’s the problem… there’s always a bigger fish. All around you in the shadowy, dark water, you don’t need Jedi powers to sense that something, or some THINGS are swimming around you.
Liiiiiike maybe some of those infamous Naboo water creatures? Was that the tail of a sando? It takes you about three seconds to swim to the surface. And once you’re able to breathe again, you realize you’re not in the trash compactor anymore.
You’re in one of Jabba’s Palace dungeons. Ohhhh noes…
It’s old and musty, and nothing seems to be in there. Except perhaps, the large rodent-like things creeping around the walls, squeaking an unearthly squeak that makes your skin crawl. You turn around to where a sliver of light has fallen and you see something small and green and round… OMG THAT IS A GEONOSIAN BRAIN WORM EGG. The knowledgable SW fan you are can’t comprehend as to why the dungeon has brain worm eggs in it, but your body’s fight-or-flight response could care less. You start looking around everywhere for an exit, for the source of the light, for something… as one of the worms cracks out of its shell.
It was then you see that the sliver of light was coming from an small opening near the floor, perhaps where guards poked through prisoner’s food. You desperately try to fit through, but it’s too small. However, somewhere, wedged in that old thing is a rusty key. You jam that sucker in the gate’s lock faster than you can say “that is one ugly bug” and make a run for it down yet another hallway. And you start thinking “why are there so many stinkin’ hallways??” But dude, it’s a haunted house. What do you expect?
And the hallways naturally have creepy crawlies crawling about. Your foot squishes in something; you tell yourself to not look. You keep running. You trip over something. And yeah, it’s something, or somebody’s bone. This place may be deserted, but you aren’t alone… it must be huge. Rancor? Acklay? Wampa?
Out of nowhere, a blood-curdling shriek rips out as a mynock on the dungeon wall jumps out at you! And there’s no glass between you this time! Again, you get up and run. Spooked by the critter, but knowing that mynocks are hardly the most dangerous creatures, you feel a little better. You finally see the hallway open up.
At first glance, it seems just like a normal old room. But as a small light reveals, this is an old, crashed ship of some sort. As you look closer… it’s the ruins of an AT-AT. You can’t make all the details out, but there might be some dead stormtroopers lying around, and that’s quite enough evidence for you. Huh. For as long as you’d been a SW fan you’d always wanted to see the inside of an AT-AT… now all you want to do is get out as you check behind you for any more creepy creatures.
You finally find an opening, and once you’ve squeezed your way out of the old machine’s exit, you think it’s all over, and a part of you’s like “I think I want to go in that haunted house again!” But then you realize that everything is really, really red. You have walked out of that All-Terrain Armored Transport into Dathomir. You turn your head over an inch and choke back a scream; it’s one of those pods where the zombie Nightsisters come out of!! You soon realize it’s empty, and that’s because… THERE’S ONE RIGHT BEHIND YOU!!!
You let loose a scream. If you’re a guy, it’s embarrassingly girly.
Then you realize that the zombie happens to be dead still. just happened to have been stuck in that old tree behind you. Or at leas, it seems to be dead. But you don’t stick around to find out.
Again, you run. You find what looks to be an old crashed Republic Cruiser. You get on, only to suddenly find yourself, well, not on a ship of any sort, but back in Palpatine’s office.
Do you choose to vamoose out of the Haunted House entirely, or do you choose to go try a new hallway?
I’ll leave that up to you. Where you go next is your choice. If you could build anything into a SW Haunted House? What would you choose?
Oh, and a quick word of advice…
(There was once a really funny ecard here from StarWars.com with involving a stormtrooper, a punchbowl, and a dianoga. Sadly this image was lost to the mists of time… but just try and imagine it – Twilight 3/19/19)

Keep The Peace and Have a Star-Wars-tacular Halloween!
– Twilight

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SW Summer Reads – Secret Missions #1: Breakout Squad

As the summer heat continues to blaze like a Mustafar heat wave (OK, maybe that’s somewhat of an exaggeration…), it’s always nice to cool off with a good Star Wars book… whether you’re inside with the AC or outside in the shade with a Coke. So hence why I’ve been writing these posts about the first books in my favorite-est SW series. This post will be nice since the book I’m blogging about is recent enough you might’ve actually read it.
The book is the first of Ryder Windham’s TCW Secret Missions series, Breakout Squad. It came out in ’09, back in the heyday of TCW and there’s been a new book in the series every year since (which, as you can imagine, can be a bit taxing on one’s patience… but you know what they say about not rushing art). So remember how I told you guys I prefer SW stories with characters I’m familiar with? Well… ironically, this series’ main characters aren’t even in the TCW show; they’re exclusive to this series. But really and truly, it’s no different to me than watching an episode of TCW that focuses on a lesser-known Jedi, like Lair Of Grievous. I mean, I’m a huge SW fan and I feel like I know just about everything about Kit Fisto (which is entirely far from the truth), but there was a time when he was just a guy in the background. Watching Lair of Grievous gave me a chance to get to know him better, and now I consider him an familiar face in the SW Universe. So this was kinda my chance to get to know some very new characters. And in the end, this is a great series so far, and its first chapter is definitely worth the read. So go crack it open if you haven’t already and join me in reading Breakout Squad!
NOTE: Contains spoilers from Breakout Squad and the TCW episodes Destroy Malevolence and Hostage Crisis

(Image credit: Amazon.com)
So if you haven’t already figured it out, this series takes place in the Clone Wars era. In fact, it’s early enough in that era that it was like, two weeks ago when the Malevolence ran into a certain moon (assuming of course that the Season 1 episode Destroy Malevolence actually happened in that timeframe… believe it or not, the events that unfold in TCW are somewhat out of order! *Twilight makes note to get the TCW complete episode guide*). It’s absolutely too cool to see this story happening so close to the episode itself – which was one of the very first I remember watching and enjoying! Oh, wait I’m getting ahead of myself — what does this timeline have to do with our story exactly? Well, the story opens up with actually some familiar faces at the wreckage of the Malevolence. Okay, I know the only reason they’re familiar faces is because they’re clones and… yeah, they kinda all look and sound alike. But these books give us a chance to meet these particular clones, which starts off as three Shinies all who could use a name. The threesome find some interesting things in the wreckage that in turn help them achieve a name. The clone who spots something the others wouldn’t so easily notice is bestowed the name Sharp. And the clone who knows a thing or two about technology that comes in handy is dubbed Breaker. The third one… well, his name was given later, but it makes perfect sense; the super quiet, Ferb-of-PhineasandFerb-sort clone got named Chatterbox 🙂 I love that Breaker doesn’t comprehend irony or satire very well… he’s all “Isn’t that name sorta contradictory?”
So long story short, Sharp and Breaker pick up on the fact that the Malevolence may have been made of parts made by the assumed neutral planet Kynachi. So that’s why the Chancellor figures it’s worth sending out an… um… expert on the planet to the mission. And that’s what leads us to meeting one of the main characters, an unfamiliar face named Ring-Sol Ambase: Jedi Master. Ring-Sol was born on Kynachi, but he doesn’t look it… Kynachi people usually have gold hair from the food they eat, but Master Ambase has the total opposite hair color — silver. He wasn’t quite sure that this was his mission just because it was his birthplace, which btw he has no memory of or any other connection to. So you can kinda figure that Palpatine’s up to something. Nevertheless, Ring-Sol is insanely cool. He has a pretty calm demeanor, he’s extremely wise, a very good teacher, strong, and has a good heart. And yes, you heard me right he’s a teacher. A master to be precise, and that leads us to our next main character, his Padawan Nuru Kungurama.
Nuru’s pretty young still, about Ahsoka’s age at this point, perhaps? IDK really. And if you thought his name was exotic (and totally cool and hard to pronounce), he’s a Chiss, a blue-skinned, red-eyed humanoid (which are totally cool, though I can’t figure whether it’s pronounced with a soild “c” or a “ch” sound) that aren’t seen too much around the galaxy. He’s been through a lot, including the loss of his previous master at the infamous Geonosis battle, but he’s doing his very best to stay strong and seems to have a good relationship with his new master, Ring-Sol. And apparently, it’s strong enough a relationship that, when Nuru senses his Master won’t come back from this Kynachi mission, Nuru decides to follow him aboard… (hey, you can do a lot when you use mind tricks on clone passengers and hide in a closet)
This remind you of a lot of situations in the SW Galaxy? OK, maybe not a lot, and maybe most of them are in The Clone Wars. But still, Nuru and Ahsoka could have a lot to talk about, and I’m sure they’re not the only younglings who’ve wanted to lend a hand… even when their hand wasn’t necessarily wanted. How will this go? Well, we’ll have to read all the stories before we know how it all works out in the end, but until then, we read on.
Aaaaaanddd then something bad happens. Kynachi had itself a Separatist blockade… and Ambase and his clones ran dead into it (Well, they were trying to go to Kynachi, so you can’t really blame them, and they still assumed they were, you know, a neutral planet and all). Which resulted in a couple of escape pods separating the clones and the Jedi as they plummeted to other sides of the planet. Nuru and Ambase didn’t see each other face-to-face exactly, but Ambase sensed him and suddenly figured out why he had this nagging feeling Nuru was nearby the whole trip. And that was the last the two heard of each other as the adventure on Kynachi began.
Somehow Nuru and his clone team, made out of Breaker, Chatterbox, and Knuckles (named so for his epic strength; unless you’re stronger, I don’t recommend arm wrestling him) got out pretty smoothly. Of course, then there were some droids to deal with. Not too fun. But this makeshift team is determined to reunite with Ring-Sol and the rest of the clones. Now, how to do such in this small Kynachi village without raising alarm is the challenge…
Meanwhile, the landing wasn’t so smooth for those in Ambase’s pod, especially since Ambase got knocked unconscious. But his loyal clone team, led by Sharp, will do what they can to keep the general out of harm’s way (even when nearly attacked by a horde of huge crustacean-like creatures; also not fun).
Back to Nuru’s side of the story, the clones prove how awesome they are at improvising. Or maybe not, depending on how you view this. I mean, their clever disguise certainly hides the clone armor and Nuru’s Jedi getup, but… they were made out of fertilizer bags. I don’t know nor do I want to know what the fertilizer is made of, but it stinks to high heaven. Yes, the smell keeps away the riffraff, but… yeah… we’re all on the same page I think. It does make for some good dialogue; let’s just be glad we can’t smell it ourselves 😛 Of course, it always helps to use Jedi mind tricks in serious situations. And that said mind trick gets the attention of a certain someone who just might be able to lend a hand…
That someone is Lalo Gunn: Corellian-pilot-turned-restaurant-owner with quick wit and a sharp bite. She’s been stuck on this planet since before the war and has hopes that helping this ragtag, less-than-pleasant-smelling Republic team might be able to help her as well. Anyone else love how much like Han Solo she is? Same for Leia? Yeah she’s totally cool 🙂 But then all of a sudden… there’s battle droids and Lalo’s trusty copilot-turned-waiter droid gets fried. And then comes along another familiar face — Cad Bane. Ohh yes… but it’s not what you think; this gang doesn’t know him or how nefarious and sly he is. This is some time before he wreaked havoc in the Senate Building, but he’s still taking orders from Sidious. However, as I said before, Nuru, Lalo, and the clones have no idea that he wasn’t just an innocent passerby caught up in the droid’s fire. Bane apparently was here for a job, has the key out of the blockade, and he just might know where to find a certain Jedi General and his clones. And everyone’s like “Sure! We’ll help you if you help us!” It would’ve been great if it had gone that way, right? But it sure seemed like a good idea at the time. So off went Bane and the gang, along with Lalo’s copilot droid, who’s been refurbished into a loyal commando droid they call Cleaver, off to free Ambase and his team from the Kynachi jail! Just call them “The Breakout Squad” (see that’s where the title comes from!)!
So, as not to give away all the details (and because I don’t remember all of them and I no longer have the book checked out to reference back to it *Twilight makes note to just buy this series already*) of the breakout, I’ll make note of the most noteworthy deets.
A) They sneak in by having Cleaver convince the guarding droids there was a communication problem going around (“I haven’t heard of any communication problem.” “Well, the problem’s why you haven’t heard of it, duh!”). Anyone else wonder why it is that the Separatists used them so much when they’re not so bright and cut like butter? Well, for the sake of our heroes, I’m not complaining.
B) The did the best reusing of a classic SW line – “Lock the door and hope they don’t have blasters”! I totally geeked out at that XD
C) Breaker had an awesome secret weapon.
D) Nuru confronted the Separatist leader who had taken control of Kynachi. Didn’t get him, though.
E) Breaker nearly died. (Spoiler alert: he didn’t!)
F) Sharp and the rest of the clones are freed, along with everyone else imprisoned, but alas! Where’s Master Ambase??
And finally, G) Kynachi is liberated!! Yayyay!!
So Lalo gets Nuru, Cleaver, and the clones aboard her ship, the Hasty Harpy, and off they go to the next chapter. They have zilch idea as to where Cad Bane went though… and still have no idea where Ring-Sol is. That little detail? Bane has him, still unconscious and alive and ready to be shipped to wherever Darth Sidious wants him to. Hence why immediately after reading this, we all freak out “OMG WHAT HAPPENS NEXT?!?!” and rush to the library to get the next book. However, my closer look at The Curse Of The Black Hole Pirates will come later on. I’ve read the first three books, but I still haven’t read the fourth one and I’m getting kinda antsy, especially since it’s been over a year. But truth, Breakout Squad is a great opener to this exciting and awesome series. Easily one of my faves, Mr. Windham did excellente! 🙂
Sorry if this blog seems a bit rushed, but stay tuned — the finale for this year’s SW Summer Reads is coming up next!
Keep The Peace,
– Twilight

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SW Summer Reads – Jedi Quest: The Path To Truth

If you’re wondering why there hasn’t been a blog in a while… I suppose you can blame it on all these crazy SW-related happenings happening on a day-to-day basis. Between rewatching TCW episodes I haven’t seen in forever, finally seeing The Ewok Adventures movies, and all this crazy exciting new SW news in general (including a rumored Clone Wars Soundtrack… aw yeahhhh!), it’s been difficult to figure exactly what to blog about! And by the time I finally got to rereading the book I’m blogging about, writing notes about it, and getting all prepped to make a post, I just had to catch a cold! 😦 Sigh… such is life oftentimes, but now at last I’ve got my creativity regained (I usually lose some of it when I get the sniffles and have to wait until I’m well again to get it back; To make it clearer, I stink at writing and drawing when I’m sick) and everything ready to make a fantastic new blog!
So, to explain this new series of posts I’m calling Star Wars Summer Reads…
As a SW fan, I love reading SW stories. Love ’em. After I finally got acquainted with the Prequel Trilogy in 2011, I was excited to read some SW fiction for realsies, because after all, watching Episode I alone helped me understand and have a greater appreciation for the Originals. But well, there’s something rather intimidating about the section of Timothy Zahn novels at my library… I didn’t know where to begin! To me personally, I prefer SW stories that involve the characters I’m familiar with in timelines I’m familiar with, that mainly feature the good guys and keep them good guys (I’ll be honest, folks, there’s small chance I’ll ever read Dark Empire), and are legit Star Wars without being confusing (as I am still a Padawan SW fan). So I found the best place for me to start was in my library’s children’s section. Not saying I’ll never read the “grown-up” SW novels (especially considering that I really want to meet this Mara Jade I’ve heard so much about), but for now, this is where my comfort zone lies. Anyway, my library have two shelves of just their SW young readers’ fiction… and I just ate. it. up! That day, a few weeks past seeing Episode I, I grabbed ahold of Grievous Attacks (a novelization of TCW Season 1 episodes Rookies, The “Droid” 2-Parter, and Lair of Grievous) and Jedi Quest: The Path To Truth. Since then, I have enjoyed three particular series: Jude Watson’s Jedi Quest, Paul and Hollace Davids’ Jedi Prince, and Ryder Windham’s The Clone Wars: Secret Missions. I thought it’d be fun to give you guys a Closer Look and my thoughts on each series’ first book. So now if you haven’t read them, you can read them and then read the following blogs and enjoy my random ramblings and spazzings on each. I’ll eventually get to the other chapters in each series, but until then, you can enjoy the ride! I’m writing a Closer Look on each of these books in chronological order of its happening in the SW galaxy, so it makes sense to start off with the series that meets in between Episodes I and II. Now, making the jump to LIGHT READ!
Ugh that was terrible… I’m sorry… (HyperCollinsSpace?) AGAIN. I’m SORRY. I’ve got too many SW reading puns… just you wait until Star Wars Reads Day! If you’re not annoyed now, you will be… 😛
Grievous Attacks was the first SW book I ever read, (I hadn’t really seen much of TCW at the time but I knew enough to feel comfortable reading it) but as for Jedi Quest… that was the first SW fiction I ever read! Rereading this past week has been fun, especially considering I barely remembered what happened in it. Bottom line, when I first read Jedi Quest, it was right around a difficult couple of days in my life and I barely remembered the book itself. Plus, it’s been over two years, so it was overdue for a reread anywayz.
NOTE: Contains spoilers from Episode I, Episode II, Jedi Quest: The Path To Truth, and various TCW Episodes Blue Shadow Virus, Deception, The Gathering (and the episodes that follow), Revenge, and The Lawless.
Cover Art of Jedi Quest: The Path To Truth
(Image credit: Amazon.com)
Jedi Quest: The Path To Truth, is written by the awesome Jude Watson and is the kickstarter for her Jedi Quest series. The Path To Truth is sort of the #0, as it precedes the events of the following series and can be read separately from the rest of the series, so it’s simply referred to as Jedi Quest on the cover. Just don’t want us get confused when I do my next blog on the actual series’ first chapter. Upon rereading this book, I was shocked that I had forgotten so much of this story’s intense fights, daring escapes, and raw emotions! At the time I’d first read it, I had only just seen Episode I, so it was a perfect bridge to seeing Episode II several months later. Ms. Watson has some serious skills when it comes to writing; the way she gets into the minds of Obi-Wan and Anakin is astounding… so if you haven’t read this yet, go and read it! It’s nothing new (in fact, it was written a year prior to Episode II’s release, 2001), so you shouldn’t have too much trouble digging it out of your library. But still, it’s so so worthwhile!
The story opens in a pretty planet-shaking flashback of a younger Anakin on what began as a perfect day on Tatooine. Perfect weather, no work, and a picnic with a friend… what could possibly go wrong, right?? Well, as any SW fan knows, peace and perfection will often be interrupted by something like war, battles, bounty hunters, explosions, etc… in this case, it was a very sad thing as Anakin’s community was hit by a slave trader named Krayn (using the term “slave trader” loosely here; the guy’s horrible! But you knew that). My heart breaks for dear little Anakin as he sees his friend lose a parent and his mom in mortal fear. Poor kid… it’s hard to ignore what exactly shaped his life. Give us about six years later, and the tides have shifted; Anakin’s a Jedi Padawan and he’s helping Obi-Wan drive through… Illum, of all places. It’s funny to think that Anakin’s only twelve and may I repeat HE’S DRIVING?! Not all the way of course, but dang. How must it feel for Obi-Wan here to admit that his very young apprentice can drive better than he can? XD
It’s like poetry reading what Ms. Watson wrote from Master Kenobi’s point of view. You see this side of Obi-Wan that we don’t see a whole lot; a more vulnerable, caring side. Not that he doesn’t ever come off as such (Anakin to Obi-Wan: “How can you be so calm?!” “I’m not; I just hide it better” – TCW Season 1 episode Blue Shadow Virus), but as my theory still states, a part of him is trying to be a “perfect Jedi” after all of the mistakes he’s made in his youth and his standing as the likely youngest Jedi to have a Padawan, so of course he sticks to his “focused Jedi” guns. This book, and the other Jedi Quest books to follow, give us a lot of time to see into this awesome guy’s heart and soul. And being a huge fan of Obi-Wan, it’s TOO MUCH AWESOME!! X3 It’s really something seeing the way these two work together, especially as what started out as a lightsaber-building excursion became an intense near-death fight with a herd of vicious gorogodons (don’t you just love when stuff like this happens?! 😛 )! I think to call the battle “nail-biting” would be the understatement of the century (I don’t know how it is but I spent a whole lot of reading this book crying, gasping, and spazzing); I mean, Anakin was knocked off his feet for a long enough time for us to figure that Obi-Wan, who was already in over his head, was a goner. And then, sweet victory, Anakin makes his move at just the right moment and they both lived! Gosh, that was scary! OK OK we’re moving on from all that drama. Can you believe that it’s only been a couple chapters at this point??
So as you know, this is how Anakin made his lightsaber. It’s always interesting to note how many different ways I’ve seen lightsabers made… some make ’em hands-free (Barris Offee in the Clone Wars miniseries), some make them with friends and a cool droid (the younglings in TCW Season 5), and some just buy a SW Science Lightsaber kit from Toys R Us (that’d be me) 🙂
My guess is that methods changed after the Clone Wars started so they could get it done faster, but IDK. This method is one I’m not entirely crazy about… it’s a pretty frightening, rattling experience from what this book exposes (and btw, this was one of the first ideas about this, as Illum and the lightsaber-making process are never seen in the movies). I never said it was easy, but this whole “shadows and visions” thing… that makes it a smidge harder. This particular chapter in the book was one of the hardest to read as it hits really hard emotionally, but its being deeply emotional is one of the things that make it such a great chapter despite its sadness. Obi-Wan’s vision is so heart-wrenching to read… this is one of those parts I really teared up reading. His vision was a repeat of Qui-Gon’s death. Ouch. No Maul involved, just the feeling of helplessness as Obi-Wan once again can’t do anything to help his dear master. And the vision repeats itself until it brings Obi-Wan to his knees in tears (you read that right: tears), even more so as the vision has some sort of message in it that our awesome Jedi can’t decipher. Exposing this side of Master Kenobi, like I said before, is one of the best things about the Jedi Quest series. But boy, is it hard to not get caught up in the emotion of the moment.
On the other hand, Anakin had two disturbing visions: one involving his mom getting kicked around by Krayn and another where he faced… Darth Maul. Obviously, the first vision is both heartbreaking and infuriating as images Anakin had tried to forget resurface in his mind, and young Skywalker takes it about as well as he um… usually does when someone hurts someone he loves (which isn’t very good, and especially not the case when he’s a Padawan). And while I could ponder on this vision and Obi-Wan’s for weeks and still wonder about their affect on the duo’s lives, the second one really deserves some conversation. When I read this first time around, the whole “Darth Maul returns” TCW episodes hadn’t aired yet; in fact, it was entirely unknown to me at the time. So the fact that Maul is not only challenging Anakin, but he’s doing a lot of talking, is absolutely surreal. I was all “When did Maul get so chatty??” Looking back, I’m quite shocked how accurate his dialogue is as compared to say, Maul’s disgusting taunting of Obi-Wan back on TCW Season 5’s The Lawless. And back when this book was written, it was still assumed that Maul was dead. Maul’s going on and on about how awesome Anakin would be in the Dark Side, and somehow Anakin managed to win this battle… for now, as Maul makes it clear that the little dark part of Anakin will always be there. Yikes. It’s certainly not the last future-foretelling vision Anakin would have, but it doesn’t make it any less of a harsh reminder. Creepier still, the lightsaber Anakin made seemed to be a gift from our Dathymir friend, just Anakin got a blue blade instead of the red one that Maul offered up in the vision. Again, yikes… how it is that Obi-Wan and Anakin just walked out of the Crystal Cave like nothing happened?! I guess the fact that they had themselves called for a mission before they even left the Cave.
It’d be worthwhile to take a minute and mention something I’d thought about as the duo gets their mission from the Council. Man, the reputation these guys must have around the Jedi Temple! Anakin being mostly distrusted and doubted and Obi-Wan being so young and all… the briefing went well in the long run, but it wasn’t without some serious awkwardness. Of course, that’s what comes from the fact that this mission involves one of Anakin’s least favorite people, Krayn. Obi-Wan sorta thought for ten seconds that maybe his Padawan wasn’t the one for the job, Anakin totes didn’t agree (that awkward moment when a Jedi Padawan speaks up entirely out-of-turn in the Jedi Council; see also Ahsoka Tano) and Obi-Wan had to backtrack his thoughts and try to pretend he didn’t say that. Boy, that’s a sour way to kickstart a mission. That and having to ride in a lovely, cramped, boxy Collicoid ship. Sounds like a lot of fun, right? Don’t worry, it gets better. So, the ride begins and Obi-Wan has to take some time to reassure Anakin that he still trusts his abilities. You see through Obi-Wan’s thought process that it truly isn’t easy being a Jedi Master, nor is it easy living up Qui-Gon’s legacy. But the obvious (dare I say it) love he has for Anakin and for Qui-Gon is a constant motivator despite the difficulties.
We also learn a few intriguing things from Master Kenobi… a) he was once temporarily suspended from the Jedi Order at 13 (WHUT?!), b) Qui-Gon had a Padawan prior to him, Xanatos, who turned to the Dark Side, and c) An old Jedi friend of Obi-Wan’s has switched sides and is working for Krayn. I still don’t know all the deets on the first two, but the third one we’ll get into soon. Because thennnn Krayn ended up attacking the ship. You know how they say “be careful what you wish for”? Anakin’s learned the meaning of that one, big-time. Thankfully, the genius mind of Obi-Wan’s and the exceptional abilities of Anakin are on it. This is where the fun begins…
It would’ve been a much shorter, less complicated mission if Anakin hadn’t decided to go face Krayn… but I suppose it would’ve been a much shorter book then, too. Whyyyy do Padawans do this?? They just go off thinking they can fight anybody and then they get into trouble and their Master has to get them out of it! Of course, it’s not worth complaining about, but I was certainly ranting that right after Anakin did as such.
The trouble wasn’t Krayn this time, it was a girl named Zora. Obi-Wan knew her better as Siri; Adi Gallia’s Padawan and one of his best friends. She kidnaps Anakin, Obi-Wan outs her for leaving the Jedi Order, Siri fires back her distaste for the Jedi, and Anakin’s all “Master, could you just reprimand her over the internet and, I don’t know, consider SAVING ME?!”. #Awkward
So when one misplaces their Padawan and starts suspecting the Collicoids, it’s best to dig up some info, and Obi-Wan is especially good at digging up info. Somehow, he does a lot of it at eateries. We all know about Dex’s Diner in Episode II, but prior to that, he stopped at Didi and Astri’s Café. I love how Obi-Wan has so many awesome friends here and there and everywhere. We get the chance to meet Didi, a guy who initiated an unexpected mission for Qui-Gon a while back (uh yes, he is a guy despite the name), and his daughter Astri. What could be a better combo? Good food, good friends, and some good information delivered on the side 🙂 Oh, and free hugs! You’ll need ’em if the tip from your friend takes you to the seedy Coruscant underworld.
So getting back to that whole “Zora/Siri” thing… Obi-Wan, after some thought, believes now that she wouldn’tve abandoned the Jedi, and the Council proves his assumption to be true. Siri was indeed part of a mission spying on Krayn by masquerading as a pirate. Remember that Obi-Wan/Rako Hardeen craziness back in TCW Season 4? I get why the Jedi do things like this, but these are both situations when faking your death or pretending to go rogue don’t sit well with those left out of the plan. I for one was super happy that Siri was still a good guy; see, I somehow totally forgot her role in this book, but I remembered her better in her role in the first book of the Jedi Quest series The Way of The Apprentice from reading it for the first time last year, where she was a really cool, strong, and dedicated Jedi. So when I first read the stuff about Zora being Siri once, I had to question “Is this the same girl?!” She is, but she’d never truly been a bad girl to start with. Thank goodness… Siri is truthfully one of my fave SW fiction characters.
And what about poor Anakin? Yes, Siri is protecting him, but he’s also a slave in the Nar Shadaa spice mines. Under Krayn and his droids. A slave… again… that stinks beyond belief. The excellent description makes this terrible world a reality to the reader. But despite the horribleness of the situation, Anakin brings a little hope and an unexpected helping hand to the slaves around him, one of those being a Twi’lek woman named Mazie… and she was kind of a jerk to him! But that shouldn’t surprise us too much, considering what Shmi said about how generous and kind to others Anakin is in Episode I. In the long run, they become good friends. All the while, Anakin still holds out for his Master to rescue him
Not too far away, that’s what his Master intends to do, and he’s going to do so disguised as a slave trader. And he might also fight a wookiee henchman along the way (letting the wookiee win is out of the question; if he wins, Obi-Wan loses).
Meanwhile, despite getting into their own brand of hot water, unexpected friends Anakin and Siri have their own rescue to perform: that of Krayn’s slaves. I love how they mesh together; while some of Obi-Wan’s wisdom has rubbed off on her, Siri still maintains an understanding of both the awesomeness and frustration of working with him, in a way that relates well with Anakin. She has a good sense of wit and sarcasm amidst the insanity of it all.
“…He has this habit of telling you the truth just when you don’t want to hear it.” – Siri, on Obi-Wan in this chapter. That’s so true XD
So as they put their heads together to escape their cell, meet up with Master Kenobi, and free the slaves, it’s plain and evident they’re fast friends and work together awesomely, just as it seems was the case for Siri and Obi-Wan not too long ago.
Now, with the plan falling perfectly into place, you’d think everything would stay that way, right? But somehow, we find Krayn and Anakin staring each other down, and this time around, Anakin’s got his lightsaber. Hoo boy… this will get ugly… throughout the fight Anakin is fighting with himself as to why he’s doing this – for himself in anger or for others in justice. I mean, I’m personally glad he managed to defeat Krayn, but I do have to wonder if Anakin truly did the right thing. Anakin pushed away any thought that what he was doing was wrong with the thoughts that this was justice. But is his definition of justice correct? I myself am not entirely sure. D’oh, my head always hurts when I start going on these “Was this character truly right or wrong?” thoughts. I mean, we all know where Anakin ends up in the long long run in the SW universe and this had to have had an effect, but has Anakin always been wrong in his defeating of truly terrible villains? It’s worth some more thinking, but not right now.
It’s oftentimes a little jarring to have such a dark moment followed shortly by a light, victorious, satisfactory ending. Siri’s back to where she should be, the galaxy’s rid of Krayn, a ton of slaves are free, and the awesome threesome that is Anakin, Obi-Wan, and Siri are heading back to Coruscant in class and comfort by Senatorial escort. Even a sweet farewell between Anakin and Mazie. All is well for the moment. Yet we’re left with some concern from Obi-Wan, but he reassures himself he’ll continue to do his best to make a true Jedi out of his Padawan.
So of course, there had to be a whole series to follow this story, to tell more pre-Clone Wars tales of a younger Anakin Skywalker becoming a Jedi. Despite it may come off a tad dark in parts, Jedi Quest is an awesome awesome 5-star book and it remains a favorite of mine (even if all the SW books I’ve read have become favorites). And now you’ve managed to read through my longest blog to date, so that’s cool. So you can get excited for the next SW Summer Reads blog next week! Yayyyyy 🙂 Until then…
Keep The Peace,
– Twilight

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