SW Reads: Heir To The Jedi

All right, time to dig into another great Star Wars novel! I’m excited about this one, can you tell? 🙂

Now, in case you didn’t know, Jason Fry’s The Weapon Of A Jedi might be my favorite SW novel of all time. So coming into another Luke Skywalker story with Kevin Hearne’s Heir To The Jedi, I had very very high expectations. And since I’ve never read anything else by Mr. Hearne, I really didn’t know what to expect.
But good news: my expectations were beyond met!

Heir pretty much encapsulates everything I love about Star Wars. It has all manner of thrills and chills, it’s character-driven in the most masterful way, and there is no shortage of laughter and heart. What surprised me most, perhaps, was how easy it was to read. I expected a more dramatic tone somehow, perhaps since the last canon novel I read was Tarkin. But this book is definitely the most easygoing and fun full-length SW novel I’ve read so far! Not to say it doesn’t have its share of drama, because it absolutely does. But reading it was such a pleasurable experience! I like to think Heir is to modern SW novels as Solo is to the films. Because both stories put full focus on these amazing characters, and find just the right balance of feels and fun! And Heir‘s also an easy read because it doesn’t overwhelm us with too much new information or technical terms. Don’t get me wrong, digging into the fine details is one of my favorite things about SW books. But there’s a welcome, comfortable feel from Mr. Hearne’s descriptions that makes everything tangible and completely understandable. One of my favorite examples was with the food, which for the most part, was often just a slightly-spacey version of what we eat on earth. The relatability of the SW galaxy shines brightly in this book, and makes me feel right at home, even as we follow Luke through all manner of unique, unusual, and sometimes-terrifying worlds.

Honestly, I can’t recommend this book enough. If you’re new to SW books and don’t want to go the read-them-all-by-release-date route I’m going, this would make a great first novel! Weapon isn’t my only fave Luke story now 🙂

And now, here’s my fangirly musings commentary!
Contains spoilers from Episode III, Episode IV, Episode V, and Heir To The Jedi

– A few pages in and I’m already loving reading directly from Luke’s perspective. Like with Weapon Of A Jedi, (my favorite Luke story ATM) I love getting to know Luke at this early time after the battle of Yavin, when he was young, idealistic, and trying to figure out the Force.
– Someone get me a model of the Desert Jewel stat! Or at least a Lego kit!
– So Luke doesn’t speak astromech? Huh. I would not have guessed. Maybe he picks up some by Empire? Crud I need to watch the OT again…
– Cool seeing a new side of Rodia. But glad I can’t smell it. Points for Mr. Hearne’s descriptions, though!
– I don’t know what a needle gun does, but it sounds pretty cool, in a scary way.
– There’s nothing quite as stirring as a Clone Wars tale of Jedi heroics! I love that Luke got another glimpse into the life of his father.
OOOOOOH A PURPLE LIGHTSABER!!
– Datapads take holo stills like smartphones take photos. A longtime SW question of mine has been answered!
– The more I read this novel, the more I fall in love with its author’s cleverness and choice of words. Not to mention how wonderfully he takes on Luke’s voice.
– My fave line so far: “I hadn’t read the histories of those ‘seduced’ by the dark side, but I doubted any of them had been corrupted by a vegetable of questionable nutritional value.” XD
– The Promise and the Redemption are utterly gorgeous ship names.
YIKES the skullborers might be the scariest SW creatures in a while. I think I’d rather hug a rathtar before stepping foot on a world with possibly-sentient brain-eaters!
– Pffft Luke and Nakari’s mutual cooking fails cracked me up 😛
– I am so so glad to know ice cream exists in SW. Knowing our differing worlds share something so sweet makes me smile :3
– I never considered until now that a galaxy with so many many diverse peoples would call for a lot of different medical supplies, techniques, and knowledge. Wonder how long it’d take the average med student to graduate?
– I just realized the chapter openings all have some scientific-looking math formulas around the wording. It must have connections later in the story… wish I was more adept at math so I could see if there’s some kind of special code to crack.
– Is rancor sauce really made of rancors, or is it just something super super spicy? Also knowing what Corellia looks like, I get the feeling I wouldn’t want to eat noodles grown there… THIS BOOK IS SO FUN THO.
– Communicating with higher math? That’s a totally neat concept, but I’m with Luke… I doubt I could speak it fluently. As you might’ve noticed, I’m a writer, not a mathematician.
– They say the average galactic citizen doesn’t know of Vader. Wonder how anyone would know to even write a parody song? Hmm. An interesting exception to the rule.
– I like Nakari a lot; she’s a fun, interesting character and a great match for Luke. But I can’t help but be slightly suspicious about her for some reason…
– Something tells me TIE pilots probably don’t get very long lunch breaks. If they get lunch breaks at all. Who wants a tasty ration stick??
– Epic!! A seismic charge! Y’know, that’s one of my favorite sounds in all of Star Wars.
– Once again, Artoo saves the day, and proves once more that the SW saga would never have happened without him!
– A droid with a fake mustache is always a good thing XD
– AHHHH LUKE AND NAKARI ARE SO CUTE!! I WISH I STILL DIDN’T HAVE DOUBTS.
Oh no… I’m so sorry I spent so much of this book suspicious about her. Looking back, I realize there was little to incriminate her. Previous SW stories and Leia’s suspicions were the only things I was really going on, besides the fact the relationship was never referred to or evidenced in later stories. I figured the reason why Luke and Nakari didn’t end up with fifteen grandkids by Episode VIII was because she had ill intent. Never once did I consider that she could simply have died. I guess I loved her character enough that I didn’t want to go that route. It was safer to assume she was a scoundrel, because scoundrels could still be redeemed. But through this tragic turn, we see Luke facing the very thing that turned his father down a dark path, and coming out stronger. We know, of course, that Luke will still be prone to react rashly when his friends are in trouble, but it speaks volumes that he was able to resist the darkness and find peace in this moment. And he comes through this loss in a way decidedly the Jedi Order would not have done, but what was undoubtedly the right way to do it: through tears and through joyful memories. So much wow. What a book!

Thanks for reading along with me today. ‘Til next week!

Keep The Peace,
– Twilight

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SW Reads: Jedi Quest #3 & #4

Hello, Star Wars fan-family! I had nearly a month’s worth of wireless issues keeping me from posting, but I have plenty to write about! Including, of course, some more Star Wars Reads! (No longer really Summer Reads, but oh well) Today we’re exploring not one, but two of Jude Watson’s incredible Jedi Quest series. If you like, you can read my posts on the previous books The Path To Truth, The Way Of The Apprentice, and The Trail Of The Jedi in the respective links. (Though I will warn you, they are old
and not the same quality posts I write now.)

But yes, what more can I say on these lovely books? They are among my top top favorites! They’re so richly detailed and so masterfully written. Though I’ve never read a bad SW youth novel, these are so amazingly done that it’s hard to tell them apart from the full-length novels. Each chapter is full of deep intrigue, great character moments, and fascinating, totally-believable ideas of the state of the galaxy before the Clone Wars. Ms. Watson digs in deep on the Force, the Jedi, and Obi-Wan and Anakin’s long, sometimes-difficult road to true brotherhood. I have yet to read the recently-released Anakin And Obi-Wan comics to know what these years look like from a modern, canon perspective, but Ms. Watson’s works seem to line up with the canon stories almost flawlessly. And either way, they are amazing reads. I highly, highly recommend, especially if you enjoy the Prequels and TCW as much as I do, or if you want a better idea of what was going on between I and II.

Now, let’s dive into the fine details of these chapters. First, The Dangerous Games, an epic with both podracing and political scandal!
Contains spoilers from the aforementioned book, and some of the books prior. And if you haven’t seen Episode I you will be a a disadvantage.

– Traffic does happen in the SW universe, and not just in The Yoda Chronicles! That’s why there are spacelane officers.
– “I know, I know, feel my anger and let it go. But do I have to be a Jedi all the time, even in space traffic?” #Relatable
– Y’know I remembered a while back on one of my Rebels posts wondering if there’s a certain age you can start driving/flying in the SW universe. There’s apparently nothing out-of-the-ordinary about 14-year-old Anakin at the controls, so maybe there isn’t? Of course, I know this isn’t the final canon word, but it’s reasonable. Or maybe it’s different, depending on where in the galaxy you are.
– Ms. Watson paints the most vivid picture of this world and where the games are held. It’s fascinating and gripping! I feel like I’m there. I can feel the electricity of the busy crowds of the city, and imagining being there for a galaxywide sporting event is a thrill! Anyone else smelling hot dogs and pretzels? But at the same time, through Obi-Wan’s explanations and Anakin’s observations, we see that Eusebus isn’t as perfect and glossy as it makes itself out to be, giving me a sense of realistic caution, and a better understanding of why the Jedi’s mission is so important today.
– I just love Obi-Wan and Siri’s bond! Their conversations are so fun to read, and feel so natural and easygoing!
– I’m just now imagining Ferus Olin to have an Irish accent. Because Irish accents are cool, and it adds a little something more to his character than just the serious, unaccented voice I was giving him before.
– I also love Obi-Wan’s solid friendship with Didi and Astri. It’s one of those things that reminds me “oh yeah, Jude Watson wrote another SW series before this one and I really need to read it already”.
– Though Bog’s a bit of a blowhard, I still find him an highly entertaining character.
– I get it too, Ani. YAS PODRACINGGG!!
– Heheh ok so maybe “solid” isn’t a good description for Obi-Wan and Didi’s friendship, but it says much of Master Kenobi’s character that he’s still willing to help out the poor hapless charlatan.
– And Tru Veld is still one of my faves of her characters. His species is so cool, and he’s the most laid-back ball of sunshine in the Jedi Order! I hope he’ll come along the ride for more stories in the future 😀
– It’s so easy to agree with Anakin’s decision to help the Tyerell kids. Even though he disobeyed Obi-Wan to do it, I could see myself doing the same thing if I had the ability to do so. And of course, we all have to remember the Jedi are not right about everything. But then, at the same time, we know Anakin is doing this not just out of compassion, but also from a slight desire for vengeance. Not to mention his love of the game itself. There’s so many gray areas here, it leaves us readers with a lot to chew on.
– I absolutely can hear an Italian accent for Didi and a thick New York accent for Fligh. BTW if you didn’t read my last Reads post, you missed the part when I mentioned that I love reading Star Wars books out loud so I can do the voices.
– Seriously? Still no lap restraints in these things? Of course, maybe these air taxis are more like those little shuttles or golf carts they have in sports stadium parking lots and you’re just expected to hold on to something ’til you get there…
– Jedi have a seriously epic eye for detail and an amazing memory! This is why they’re so good at the peacekeeping game!
– I know there’s a lot of difference between them in reality, but this multi-leveled swoop bike obstacle course calls to mind the landspeeder race tunnels in the Droids series. Coincidence…?
– Aww! There was once a little yellow-tailed summerbird living in the Senate Building! Things you can learn from a good SW novel! 🙂
– Pretty sure Scorch Zanales has the coolest name of any podracer driver in the SW universe.
– And WHOAAAAA WHAT AN UNEXPECTED ENDING. Such good stuff!

Now for the next chapter, and possibly my new favorite in the series: the chilling mystery that is The Master Of Disguise!
Again, contains spoilers from the aforementioned book and some of the books prior.

– LOL the cover art totally threw me off. I kept thinking Anakin was dueling a changeling or something… I didn’t quite recognize Ferus from the back…
– Yeah when you put it that way, with such masterful, tangible descriptions, I can see why one might think sand is bleh.
– Wow! Darra and I are twins! She looked blonde to me on an earlier book’s cover art, but they’re describing it as copper-and-gold, which is exactly my color!
– I must try out her bright-ribboned padawan braid. If anyone knows of a good padawan-braiding tutorial I’d be forever grateful, because those tiny things are so strangely difficult to make… hehe sorry for all the hair talk.
– It’s amazing how these books can be both beautiful and heartbreaking in parts. Between the clear devastation of war and the regrets Anakin left behind on Tatooine, my reactions are definitely what you might refer to as “all the feels”.
– Oooh so many branches of science to study! It would be fun to be a scientist in the SW galaxy, ’cause with so many worlds, there are nearly infinite amounts of things to discover and study! Yes I am a science nerd. Did I forget to mention that?
– I really appreciate the moments with Madame Jocasta in this book and the last. I like the way Ms. Watson writes her, making her a tough old bird with a solid sense of humor!
– OK Yoda’s appearance in here was the highlight of my day. He may be my favorite voice to read out loud now.
– Whoa Tru’s lightsaber is orange? That is so cool. Could be orange ‘sabers are just for training here, but still. I think it’d be a good lightsaber color!
– Chapter Eight is so fun. Obi-Wan and Jocasta, Jedi mystery-solvers! Also glad to know that Obi-Wan likes tea, because so do I 🙂
– I’m actually starting to want Soara Antana to teach me lightsaber techniques, too. I might be a glutton for punishment, but I do love a challenge.
– OMG NOW I KNOW WHY THE BOOK IS TITLED WHAT IT IS. I DID NOT SEE THAT COMING.
– I am both wildly fascinated and horribly shook over these concepts. Granta Omega just got scarier. And non-Force-sensitive Sith cults? It just felt colder in here.
– I hope someday I learn to write plots this intricate and in-depth!
– YADDLE SPEAKS! That was really neat, because I’m 99% sure I’ll never read a SW novel giving her a spoken line again.
– Just when you think it can’t get any more intense, IT GETS SO MUCH MORE INTENSE! But that’s something I adore about this series. And this book I think may be the most intense yet!

Ahh, aren’t those just fantastic? Well, *does Yoda impression again* much to blog on, I still have. Look for one last Reads post next week, and then there’s this upcoming new series I must discuss, and also I received an amazing visual encyclopedia for my birthday, so… yep. Lots of Star Wars equals lots to write!

Keep The Peace,
– Twilight

SW Summer Reads: The Rebels Novelizations, Part 1

It’s time again for some Star Wars Summer Reads! Or I guess Summer-ish Reads for some of you guys. Anyway, the first Star Wars novel I ever read was a Clone Wars novelization compilation called Grievous Attacks. It was a really fun experience and a great introduction to SW books, so I decided it’d be fun to revisit some classic Rebels season one episodes in junior novel form! Let’s talk about Michael Kogge’s takes on Machine In The Ghost, Art Attack, Entanglement, Property Of Ezra Bridger, Spark Of Rebellion, Droids In Distress, and Rise Of The Old Masters!

I honestly forgot until I read these how fun novelizations can be. You get to dive further into the story you’ve seen on-screen, learning more little things about the SW galaxy, as well as the chance to delve into what’s going on inside the characters’ heads. Mr. Kogge did an excellent job at this, especially inside of Rise Of The Rebels, the shorts compilation. He writes a lot of depth into these already-deep little stories as we explore different perspectives (like those of Chopper or a stormtrooper), and even adds some nice new lines and moments that compliment the source material rather than overcrowding it.

Droids In Distress was a very well done compilation as well, though Spark Of Rebellion suffered a little. But I’m not really complaining; it can’t be easy trying to fit a richly-written 44-minute episode in less than fifty pages! So due to the format, Mr. Kogge was forced to skip over some of the best lines and rush much of the story. But the following novelizations were near-perfection!

Both compilations have hiccups in story compared to the actual episode, but most likely that’s because these were written before the episodes were completed. Doesn’t take away from how much I enjoyed them, though! Of course, half the fun for me was just revisiting these great early episodes! The other half, well… I’ll let you in on a secret: ever since Grievous Attacks, I read all SW books out loud to myself. I just can’t pass up an opportunity to practice my character impressions! I found out reading these that I do a pretty mean Grand Inquisitor 😀

Anyway, if you love SWR and want to explore these stories from a new angle, I totally recommend. And they’re definitely great if you’re new to Star Wars books and need a light, easy introduction. Plus, the Sabine-like graffiti artwork dispersed throughout the books is an epic bonus 🙂

Now, for the fangirl-musings commentary portion of the post.

Contains spoilers from the original Rebels shorts and episodes Spark Of Rebellion, Droids In Distress, and some important elements from the seasons beyond.

– Apparently “understatement” is a distinctly twi’lek sort of humor? I must be part twi’lek then.
– I really appreciate also that they simplify some of the technical terms a little bit. Definitely the difference between a potential first-timer’s SW story and something intensely detailed for the long-timer like Tarkin. But it’s still not oversimplified, it’s just right and makes for a pretty easy read.
– Kanan, master of a thousand one-liners. True dat.
– Considering how much they argue in this short, I might not’ve guessed that Hera was actually worried about her copilot for a moment. Awwz #feels.
– We actually get a chance to get inside Chopper’s dome in this book! Some seriously funny stuff here. Now give this hard-working little droid an oil bath already!
– This book seems to imply that Chopper’s exact “words” couldn’t be understood by organics. Always Two There Are confirmed for me that “droid” is a language you can learn. I originally thought that this fact was just something I missed in the other films and shows, but this seems to mean I wasn’t the only one who was unclear on the do-people-actually-understand-astromechs-or-are-they-just-assuming-what-they’re-saying-like-when-people-talk-to-their-pets situation. Or maybe Chopper’s comment is true, and though you can learn basic astromech, a sentient being will never understand the fine details. Knowing Chop’s ‘tude, perhaps this is a good thing…
– Apparently Ryloth is known for their firework shows. I could see that.
– Chopper has good relations with the Phantom, while the Ghost tends to be pretty rude with him. Things only ‘mechs know!
– “A thousand thousand worlds sparkled in the night sky above the capital city of Lothal.” I absolutely love how Mr. Kogge writes for Sabine. He captures so well her fiercely artistic mindset with heavily poetic descriptions. I can’t help but be a little bummed they didn’t make more of these novelizations.
– Sabine has heard the tales of Boba Fett! I still almost can’t believe we never got to see them in a face-off, but I suppose the writers knew that would be far too easy and more of a what-the-fans-want than a what-the-series-needs. But I suppose there’s nothing to say it still couldn’t happen…
– I really hope TK-626’s number was a Lilo And Stitch reference.
– The idea of the Empire specifically recruiting known bullies as Imperial Cadets at first sounded a little too obvious, but then again, remember Oleg? Frankly, I can imagine a lot of storms might’ve been ne’er-do-wells in grade school. Perhaps it’s not what the Empire is looking for alone, but it doesn’t hurt…
– “Artists were almost as bad as rebels. They could draw, paint, and create things he couldn’t. And for that, they deserved to be crushed.” Oh you guys, I think I figured out why TK-626 was a bully. THIS POOR STORMTROOPER CHILD!! I actually feel really bad for him! Thank you Mr. Kogge for helping me consider the human inside the inhuman white armor.
– I think it’s neat that Mr. Kogge paints (so to speak) Sabine as an artist first and a warrior second. Sometimes it’s easy for me to think vice versa, considering her warrior Mandalorian heritage, but when you think about her close relationship with her artistic dad, and consider the life she maybe knew before the Imperial Academy and then the mini-Alliance, it makes sense that art is her first love, and what she wants to do for a living once the war is over. Maybe once she gets Ezra back home, she’ll finally get her chance 🙂
– Apparently, Zeb isn’t all that fond of his nickname. There’s a certain way his people roll their Rs in the lasat language that most just can’t match. I like this angle. I wonder if this is a fact decided upon by the Story Group or an early assumption Mr. Kogge made. It certainly is a fascinating idea! I didn’t know they spoke anything beside Basic! Well aside from the ancient chants, but maybe that should’ve clued me in.
– Imperials don’t know many languages beyond Basic. Didn’t know that, but makes sense in retrospect.
Whoa I didn’t remember the stormtroopers being that mean to the salesnaught. All the more reason Zeb is one noble dude.
– We learn reading this that Zeb isn’t fond of ugnaughts or astromechs, but all the same, he can’t turn a blind eye to their troubles. It makes this already-amazing little story even more meaningful. AHHH SO SO NOBLE :3
– The Empire made slaves of the lasat? My first reaction was “THAT’S NOT ACCURATE! THEY WERE KILLED OFF!“, buuuuuut what if slavery was where it started? Something to consider, anyway. But I gotta say, it’s hard to imagine lasat being good slaves. The wookiees don’t work well under Kessel heat, making them less of a threat, but I imagine that wasn’t as much of a problem for the less-fuzzy-but-still-deadly lasat…
– “My old gran’s a better fighter, and she’s only two meters tall!” Pfft that’s a good one, Zeb. Wonder if this was purely Mr. Kogge’s clever writing or an unused line they recorded. But they actually elaborate further on Granny Orrelios, saying she’d lived for “three hundred dust seasons” (I’m assuming that’s 75 earth years, depending how long a dust season lasts and how many seasons they have). This is the first time we’ve ever heard of any family Zeb had, and it makes me super happy to know an inkling of his personal life before the Empire.
– I love the idea Ezra’s already had a few moments where the Force came into play before he finds himself avoiding TIE fighter fire. It makes sense, and kind of makes you wonder what adventures (and misadventures) he might’ve had on the streets of Lothal.
– Interesting that Ezra’s pretty willing to take any sort of reward, even an Imperial rescue! But hey creds are creds. Perhaps it’s this pilot’s snobbiness that drives Ez to decide to just rescue the helmet instead…
– Considering not long from now Ezra’s back to stealing food, I guess those parts didn’t get him as much cash as he hoped. Or they were stolen. Or maybe food on Lothal these days just costs a lot.
– “A sitting hawk-bat“… could that also be comparable to a lothbat?
– The second book has cool alternate episode titles: “Ezra’s Story”, “Disrupted”, and “Old Masters”.
– Sabine was drinking blue milk?? Obviously I haven’t been paying attention. Or that maybe that’s because her cup wasn’t a clear glass. Question: if blue milk is from banthas (which I’ve been led to believe), since banthas don’t live on Lothal (that we’ve seen), does that mean the Rebs are getting their food supplies from offworld? That makes sense enough. Guess I didn’t need to waste a whole paragraph on it…
– You know, unless my memory fails me, I thought the Rebels merely rescued the wookiees on Lothal before their were transferred to Kessel. I was pretty sure after seeing the hopeless world in Solo that my assumptions were for sure right. This novelization says they actually went to Kessel. I’m starting to think these books were written before the shorts and episodes were completed. That must’ve been confusing to do.
– I’ve never heard of a silverback wookiee before, but that’s a neat concept!
– I’ve always wondered what a nerf sounded like. Apparently they’re a lot like Amda Wabo…
– “Chopper recognized the astromech’s response as typical of the new R2 series. Compassion was the biggest flaw in their programming.” Suuuuure Chop, it’s a thing about their programming! ‘Cause we know you certainly don’t have a soft side!
– Also if he considers him a new R2, then how old does that makes Chopper? Well, I’m not saying he’s old, but I think I once saw a droid that looked like him in a trailer for KotOR. *Chopper soundly zaps me for the bad joke*
– In Chopper’s words, he’s only “a few decades past his expiry date”. But he knows there are far older droids than him.
– It’s rather unusual seeing Threepio and Artoo’s roles in this story flipped, with Threeps a little more confident and Artooie a little less than happy. But an interesting twist for a story I already know well.
– Knowing that Zeb had been having horrific nightmares when he shut Ezra out of their room… even though I’ve watched this episode seven times, and though I know his story doesn’t end here, I can feel his pain as strongly as ever.
– I love the creepy last line Kallus gets in as he’s about to strike down Zeb…
– But more so, I love the way Mr. Kogge describes the Force throughout these novelizations. He makes it feel very tactical, very real, this undeniable spark!

I don’t know about you, but I had a ball reading these. I’ll be taking next week off for my birthday, but after that, you should expect some more Star Wars Reads posts to arrive!

Keep The Peace,
– Twilight

SW Summer Reads: Tarkin

So I know this is late… probably too late to be referred to as Summer Reads, anyway. But the book we’re looking at today amazing enough to be read at any time of the year: James Luceno’s Tarkin. There’s much to discuss so let’s get goin’!
NOTE: Contains spoilers from Episode I, Episode IV, TCW “Citadel”, “The Wrong Jedi”, “Crystal Crisis” arcs, Freemakers episode The Kyber Saber Crystal Chase, and Tarkin.

A long time ago in the same galaxy, I saw Episode IV for the first time. Unfortunately I didn’t grasp it as well as I should have. I understood the basics, but I could not tell you the name of the man we know as Tarkin. Nearly ten years later, countless rewatchings of the film as well as many viewings and re-viewings of The Clone Wars and Rebels truly brought to light this truly amazing and fascinating character. And now, upon reading the book bearing his name, I know him now more than ever. Oh gosh where do I begin? James Luceno covers nearly every angle of Tarkin’s story, from his earliest adventures to the events that bestowed him the title of “Grand Moff”. But not a word of it is unnecessary; every chapter is a piece of what made Tarkin, Tarkin.
Strong, undaunted, articulate, fearless, calculating, and firm in his beliefs, I was re-reminded what an incredible character he is in just about every paragraph. Mr. Luceno wrote so well for him that I often forgot he was supposed to be a villain. But that’s just one of those things that make him such a fascinating character; he so believes in what he considers right, that he’s willing to do whatever it takes. In several situations I could agree with what he was after, but I couldn’t fully agree with his methods to get it. And as we watch him take on a group of less-than-scrupulous rebels, we really get to dig into deep thoughts on the difference between right and wrong… and how easily those lines can be blurred. Dude this book’s got philosophical thoughts for days! It’s amazing stuff!
And there is so much I learned from this novel. Tarkin’s had connections with just about all the big events in SW history in one way or another, and we get to experience those from his unique perspective. Not to mention just the general discussion on SW tech, warfare, and everyday life. There’s something special about knowing the inner workings of these things, even something as seemingly average as a comlink. I also learned quite a few new big words I had no idea existed in the English language, and i consider myself very well-read so it rather took me aback I didn’t know every word 😛 (Please don’t tell me I’m the only one who didn’t know what an “adjutant” was!) The book’s both deep and in-depth, definitely not a beginner’s SW novel, but a truly incredible one nonetheless.
Tarkin’s life story brings both a sense of empowerment as an ordinary guy achieves great status, but also one of sadness as, for all of his intelligence and cunning, he still understood so little of what truly mattered in life. Many times throughout the story that last fateful image of the Grand Moff came to mind. That last shot as he quietly observed the battle, not truly believing anything or anyone could knock down the battle station he put so much faith in. And then he and that battle station were gone in an instant. The book is a powerful reminder to be careful of where the lines blur, and that power gained by wrongdoing ultimately fails us in the end. I’m sorry if I butchered that in any way but ahhhh this book’s so so powerful! Every inch of Mr. Luceno’s story was masterfully written, so much so I can barely put into words how much so it was.
And now, some other thoughts I had while reading the book. Enjoy the randomness (and the occasional moment of deepness).

– Had to read this one slowly. A lot of information, a lot of politics, a lot of stuff to digest.
– Tarkin sounds 100% like I’d expect him to.
– Gets fashion advice from a protocol droid. #Fabulous
– Scars from previous battles? Hmm Tarkin’s had a lot of adventures hasn’t he?
– THE HOLOFASHION MACHINE OMG I NEED THAT.
– What’s a fitness apparatus?? Hah yeah he totally lifts bro.
– Wow such great descriptions…
– Hehe Tarkin was a ginger just like me, has blue eyes too– wait oh dang I hope I don’t look like Tarkin when I’m his age O_O
– Nah I could never match his cheekbone game.
– “Outer Rim” is an accent??? Mind. Blown.
– Wow someone likes looking at himself, don’t he?
– So all that stuff on the Imperial uniforms actually has a purpose? Not just greeblies anymore? Cool. Imperial cosplayers take note!
– Pff this is gonna be one of my weirder posts.
– Ehhh not a big fan of Grand-Uncle Jova… but fascinating trying to imagine Tarkin as a small child. I can barely see it.
– BTdubs I imagine a name like “Wilhuff” got him bullied a bit as a kid.
– Whoa dude’s a real multitasker. I never thought I’d say I’d want to be like Tarkin in any way, but I’d sure like to do that.
– YAYY I LOVE A PARADE!! Oh wait it’s full of Imperials bleh XP
– Parking lots are a thing in SW. Good to know.
– I’m really enjoying learning more about how the Empire works. Makes me feel super-smart, too 🙂
– Thing I learned today: “Comm” applies to the hologram communication devices as well as the little microphones they talk with… at least, I think so. I could be reading it wrong…
– Also I realized I think I typically have spelled it “com” with one m. Not feeling quite as smart right now.
– Hmmmm Tarkin’s good. *Nods*
– Can I just say I love learning about SW tech? I know I’ve said it before but it’s still seriously cool.
– Admiral Trench! I knew that guy! I remember that battle!
– OK wow this whole thing with the Droid Gotra. A bunch of battle droids gone rogue! Kind of a scary thought, but also kind of cool to know they had that kind of free will. Think R0-GR ever ran in that crowd?
– Wait I’m confused… Poggle The Lesser didn’t design the Death Star? Or did he? The Death Star’s origins remain a mysteryyyyyyyyyyyyyyy it seems…
– Man it’s kind of amazing how much effort truly went into the Death Star. All these millions of probably decent people contributing to this mysterious ultimate weapon in many ways. It’s astounding, though in a rather sad way.
– Hey look it’s Mas Amedda. Vizier is quite a fancy title. Much better than “secretary” like I was calling him 😛
– Did they seriously just describe him as an “ambitious amphibian”? I mean, that’s really good wordplay, but is his species actually amphibious? Huh the things you learn from SW books!
– Is it wrong I really enjoyed Tarkin and Amedda’s conversation? Hehe so much snarkiness, my goodness!
– Wooo galactic history lesson! I love how this novel was written as if speaking to the everyday citizens of the galaxy, not to us dumb Earth people 😛
– Actually maybe it’s more like a galactic news report than a history lesson.
– The ancestral pioneer Tarkins sound like cool peeps.
– Keep in mind I said “ancestral”. Tarkin’s parents are purty snooty.
– Also if they’re as rich and fancy as they are, why does his dad even consider putting his elbows on the table, even for emphasis? Breakin’ your own rules Mr. Tarkin.
– It’s funny though… little Wilhuff sounds like an adorable kid. I can see it now.
– But seriously still what kind of parenting is this?? “Oh look here come the men to kidnap you for your rite of passage! Have fun honey!”
– Joke’s on them though ’cause little Wilhuff was prepaaaaared.
– Oh hi Grand-Uncle Jova. Ah this explains the “blood” comment. All about the context.
– So far this makes me feel really bad about my lack of survival skills.
– Think using animal interiors (like tauntauns) as shelters was a covered topic? Ew…
– Such a waste of a perfectly good vest. Not to mention the poor critter. But I don’t need to tell you that.
– AHH DANG BRO ATE RAW LIVER. THAT’S GROSS.
– Smol Tarkin has guts. (Absolutely no pun was intended)
– Seriously.
– He has GUTS.
– He did some gross stuff out there.
– I couldn’t do what he did.
– At all.
– #Respect
– Wonderful childhood amiright?
– OK Tarkin just figured out that Imp was using spice from a stain on his shoe. Wow he’s good. So so good. Hey, he may be considered a slightly bad dude but at least he expects his crew to be decent!
– Oooh the Carrion Spike is a stealth ship! Very fancay.
– Not sure his uncle gives the best advice still tho.
– Any weird chance this Q’anah girl might be related to Aurra Sing? Or if not, that maybe they hung out on the weekends and talked piratey-bounty-huntery things?
– Yay he caught the pirates. But yikes the way he did ’em in… that’s all I got: YIKES.
– OMG Palpatine’s living in the former Jedi Temple?? UGH YOU SCUMBAG.
– Sorry that might’ve sounded mean but it’s kinda true.
EEEEEEEEEEEEEEEP IMPERIAL GUAAAAAARDS!!! ❤ ❤
– *Is punched for that brief fangirly outburst*
– New thing I learned: Coruscant natives are referred to as "Coruscanti".
– AHHH TEACH ME YOUR STAR WARS WRITING WAYS, MR. LUCENO!
– Pff the Emperor is such a diva.
– Well actually he's just a very very busy man with his Death Star and stuff… oh who am I kidding he's still a diva XD
– If you think that's scary, wait 'til they hear about the Palaptine Museum they're building!
– Anyway, it's nice to know Wilhuff had a friend or two. He doesn't typically seem like the social type.
– Maybe if he used a different cologne. Whatever it is, it's not a scent that the Rebels care for. *Tomatoed*
– Oh yeah I remember the Citadel escape! That was fun 🙂
– *Cough not for most everybody tho cough*
– Hehe the looks Ahsoka gave him were well-deserved, but priceless XD
– And I'm getting off-track again.
– Whaaaat Palpatine was a ginger too?? So when we see him in Episode I, that blonde hair of his is fake? Haha he really is a diva.
– DON'T FORCE-CHOKE ME EMPEROR SIR.
– Hehe Tarkin's absolutely fanboying getting to meet the good Senator here.
– And by "teacher" you mean Plagueis, right?
– *Is punched for stating the obvious*
– Yeesh stop punching and tomatoing me already dude!
– Wow Palpatine is so good at being bad.
– Tarkin's entrance game is 110% on-point. I wish I could rock that confidence.
– *Stupidly imagines Tarkin as Kuzco from The Emperor’s New Groove* BOOM BABYYY!
– Get it? Because his entrance game was on-point…?
– Just… trust me on this. It’s hilarious.
– *Tomatoed*
– Lol haters gonna hate, Wilhuff. Just shake it off.
– *Ducks from tomato and fist*
– Hmm bro was a bit of a bad boy in the academy. Who’da thunk?
– THEY’RE JUST JEALOUS ‘CAUSE YOU’RE SO FABULOUS AND CLASSY.
– “Lightsaber diplomacy”… I like it. Or as some call it, “aggressive negotiations”!
– My first instinct is to assume Tarkin’s reading into the Jedi all wrong, but who knows? They’re might’ve been some snobby ones back in the day.
– Tarkin’s survival skills are also 110% on-point.
– If you ignore the fact it was an act of survival, it sounds like Tarkin could host the best campouts ever!
– …no, not really.
AHHHHHH VADERRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRR!!
– Also boo Tarkin you were such a jerk to Ahsoka.
– But whatever it’s VADERRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRR!!!!!!
– Yep that’s Vader. Still as scary and awesome as ever.
– Though yikes the way he killed that guy…
– Please Amedda, Darth don’t care about your dumb rules.
– “I will give the matter some thought…” translation: not ever.
– The fact they literally have to designate where and when he executes people really says something about where the Dark Lord is right now.
– He powerful and he angryyyyy.
– Fascinating seeing the mutual respect Tarkin and Vader have for one another. Seriously.
– Oh wow Tarkin figured it out. Bro’s smart.
– It’s kind of freaky seeing the two Empire big-shots engaging in some casual small talk. Aside from the Lego one-liners, what must it’ve sounded like to hear Lord Vader just talk casually without intending to strike fear into someone? Can he even do that??
– Uh-oh did they end up finding that massive kyber for the thing?? How??
– Man they put so much work into that Death Star. How did they forget that one teeny little hole…?
– Only Tarkin could tell the Emperor “I like what you’ve done with the place”, and not be severely Force-lightninged.
– Somehow I’m not surprised Palpatine’s proud of his decor.
– Seriously Tarkin’s theories are right again! Mostly.
– Like I said earlier, watching Tarkin having pleasant conversations with the Darths is amazing. Just the fact that either of the darksiders could ever act like a decent human being is fascinating and really cool.
– Tarkin does freelance writing in his spare time. Who knew? Maybe he runs a holoblog? I’d read that. “Talkin’ Tarkin: Thoughts Of An Imperial Governor” or maybe “Keep Calm And Carrion Spike: A Governor’s Life”?
– THAT MOMENT WHEN IT SUDDENLY OCCURS TO YOU YOU KNOW WHO NILS TENANT IS AND YOU FEEL LIKE AN IDIOT FOR NOT RECOGNIZING HIM.
– Hi Yularen! Fun fact I seriously didn’t realize he was in Episode IV up until a few months ago.
– Took a minute to look up Janus Greejatus in the starwars.com databanks just out of curiosity and boy is he scary-looking.
– Interesting stuff happens when all the big-shot Imps get together in one room…
– It’s fascinating watching Sidious and Vader interact one-on-one… and quite chilling.
– Wow Tarkin and Palpatine knew each other on a first-name basis. Practically BFFs.
– Lol not really. OK maybe a little.
– Whoa a clone-turned-storm. I feel kinda bad for this Sergeant Crest.
– Really interesting seeing what Tarkin understood about the Jedi from his side of the story. What difference would it have made if he’d known the truth about the Clone Wars and the role the Jedi played in it? I’m gonna shoot looks at him like Ahsoka did though XP
– Oooh a little Dooku backstory! This novel literally has everything!
– Seems he made a different kind of spark of rebellion, huh? Not the good kind, but still veryyyyyyyyyy interesting…
– I want a book on Dooku’s life story now, OK? That would be awesome.
– Tarkin and Dooku in the same room but on opposing sides! Great stuff!
– Sidious’s droid is Plagueis’s old droid. Goodness, he must be an old thing.
– Oh wow I read into that wrong. Vader might have some respect for Tarkin, but apparently he’s been a little sore with him since the Ahsoka incident. Heh I know I would.
– When you read a SW book you learn something new just about every page! It’s seriously amazing.
– So the Emperor’s plan: let’s stick the two on a mission together and see what happens! Great idea! This won’t end badly at all!
– Well I guess it actually might not and they’ll become buddies up until the Death Star goes boom.
– Just have to see I do suppose.
– AHHH WOW SIDIOUS IS TERRIFYING. HE KNOWS EVVVVERYYYYYYYYYYYTHINGGGGGGGGGGGGG.
– “Chapter Ten: A Better Womp Rat Trap”. These chapter titles are amazing btw.
– He literally just compared the smell to rancid cheese. I like Mr. Luceno’s style. Serious, but completely honest 🙂
– Wheeeee we’re takin’ a ride in an old-school gunship!
– Koorivar have a single cranial horn… so they’re unicorns then??? *SHOT*
– *Twilight wracks her brain trying to recall where she last heard the name “Crymorah” in SW*
– Uh-oh there went the Carrion Spike.
– And Tarkin ain’t a fan of none of this.
– He got some doubts.
– Vader’s patience with him is impressive.
– Oh yeahhhh I remember the Sugi now. From back on Anakin and Obi-Wan’s crystal misadventures!
– That’s probably where I remembered the Crymorah from too.
– OK so that clears that up.
– Note to self: it’s spelled “gotal” not “gothal”. *Sigh* now I gotta fix the tags again…
– Wow a whole paragraph just talking about different varieties of body odor. Lovely.
– Again, love this book.
– Zygerrians have some fur. I did not know this.
– The fancy royal ones in TCW probably just shave it.
– The things ya learn!
– Pirates they may be but I like ’em. They’re the cool crew.
– DUDE DON’T TELL VADER HOW TO DRIVE. HE’S GOT THIS.
– AND DON’T QUESTION VADER’S PLANS. HE’S GOT THIS.
– Whoops. Nevermind they’re gone.
– Noooope Vader’s stillll got this bro.
– “DARTH SIDIOUS WAS ANNOYED…” What else is new? XD
– More cool SW tech terminology: “holocams”!
– These rebel-sorts are gooooooood.
– Governor Motti’s first name is “Antonio”. Fabulous name bro.
– Pooooor sleepy Tarkin…
– But he’s still sharp as ever when figuring out the rebs’ next move.
– Interesting looking at the opposing angles of Teller and Hask’s thoughts on innocents in the Empire. These rebs work well together and that’s likeable, but they’re not quite the rebs you wanna cheer on. They’re not the Ghost crew, who try to keep from killing people they don’t have to. These piratey rebs don’t seem to care who gets caught in their crossfire, with the exception of Hask, it seems. Seriously this concept is genius. They make you subliminally root for who we usually know as the “bad guys”. Wow. first time seeing some actual depth in these observations of mine in a long while.
– Oooooh Tarkin isn’t gonna be too happy when he gets a load of all that damage done to his ship…
– Y’know is it just me or does it seem that Teller doesn’t like Tarkin? /sarc/
– OMG HASK IS RIGHT. HASK IS SO RIGHT.
– When lines get blurred… stuff happens. Not good stuff usually.
– Ahh wow this book!
– “Magnetically sensitive”? Is that normal for all gotals or just Salikk?
– Sounds like Salikk leads a hard life.
– I’m sorry I’m not saying more right now but there’s so much to wrap my mind around OMG.
– Yep you can still tell that’s Anakin in there. Just as impatient as ever…
– Ohhh it’s read as OneOne-FourDee not Eleven-FourDee I feel dumb.
– SW computers are cool. It’s fascinating how they work and what they’re capable of compared to our technology.
– It’s too bad, Tarkin could’ve been a great wildlife journalist (or whatever you’d call it) had he not ended up in the Empire.
– That and the fact he didn’t bat an eyelash at killing anything he deemed dangerous or edible.
– Vader is so terrifyingly good.
– “Moff Tarkin sends his regards” *Drops the mic*
– “…Race to the light of the lasers!” might be the coolest line in the whole book.
– Coruscant has weather control waaaaat??
– They seem to consider “humanoids” and “nonhumans” two different things. Wonder why?
– Guess maybe humanoids have mostly human anatomy, while nonhumans have more “alien” anatomy.
– Tarkin is absolutely all smugness right now.
– Anora deserves a medal for that beautifully poetic burn.
– Tarkin don’t care tho he jus’ gonna shake it off, shake it off.
– But seriously she is 110% right.
– So right it’s scary.
– Hey hey everybody there’s a new GRAND MOFF in town!
– It somehow never occurred to me what a big deal being grand moff is until this moment.
– And then I only now realized this story takes place after Rebels. At least, I think so. In Rebels he was only governor and I don’t think the Death Star was quite under construction yet.
– It only took me nearly the entire novel to figure that out!
– Orrrrrrrrrr maybe not?? Apparently he still goes by “governor” in most circles. So maybe this was before and the Death Star was just well-hidden when the Ghost crew passed by Geonosis?
– IDK man it’s all a mystery to me.
– Wow the Tark is some celebrity. Have to wonder if people still thought that after the Death Star went up in flames…
– How is it that Tarkin’s connection to the Carrion Spike inspires in me both a feeling of warmth and unease?
– Oh hey Jova how ya doin’? And hey Teller– wait waht?? How’d he get here?
– Kind of hilarious watching Tarkin and Jova just catching up like nothing’s weird while the dork reb is stuck in a trap below them.
– I’d wish Teller good luck but I don’t think he deserves it.
– THERE ARE HEROES ON BOTH SIDES AND EVIL IS EVERYWHERE!
– Oh yeah and THA DEATH STAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAR!!! Or at least the BABY DEATH STAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAR!!!
– It’s sad to think that this battle station he loves so much will one day be the death of him.
– Though I’m not gonna lie. When it first moved… I got chills, too.

And so that concludes the final SW Summer Read of the year. So glad you all got to read along with me!

Keep The Peace,
– Twilight

SW Summer Reads – The Weapon Of A Jedi

It’s Star Wars Summer Reads time again, and I’m thrilled that today I’ll be writing my thoughts on a book that actually came out in the last year! I mean, I like taking my time reading SW books, so I can properly appreciate each one and digest all its awesomeness, especially with the 100% canon books. So generally most of my posts are on older books I’ve read more than once. But there happened to have been a sale earlier this year and Jason Fry’s Journey To The Force Awakens Novel, The Weapon Of A Jedi, was there and it was useless to resist. And I am so so so so glad I bought it. It’s without a doubt one of the greatest SW books I’ve ever read. And I shall tell you the reasons why!
NOTE: Contains spoilers from Episode IV, Episode V, Episode VII and The Weapon Of A Jedi

So I’m not going to give you a full play-by-play commentary on this one like I usually do with the young readers books, I feel like honestly the best way to express my feelings for this book is to just talk about them straight-up instead of trying to retell the story and fangirl as I go. That method probably works best for the older books and episodes than this incredible book. So with that in mind it will likely be a less time-consuming post to read today! Yaysies!
Anyway, so this was released in anticipation of Episode VII, with small keys to the future of SW. TBH I probably missed most of those “keys” and I read this after seeing the film… twice. But the coolest of these keys was impossible to miss: a Resistance pilot named Jessika Pava. We open with this sweet little prologue of Threepio telling Jess the story of Luke’s first lightsaber duel. It was absolutely great getting to meet Jess Pava a little here. We haven’t seen a huge lot of her yet but clearly she’s an awesome human being. And she gets a ton of cool points for helping destroy Starkiller Base. Just from the two brief chapters we get to see her in, we feel her frustration with being stuck working on droids instead of piloting, totally understand her slight impatience with Threepio, and 100% get her admiration for the great Luke Skywalker. I do wonder a little what time exactly the prologue/epilogue takes place in, since of course yes Jess is here for the Resistance and Threepio rocks a red arm, but it must’ve been a littler earlier than most of the events in TFA because it sounds like Luke is still around and Artoo is fully functional. You just wonder how long ago it was. How long ago was it before there was a Starkiller Base? Before a young Ben Solo went down the wrong path? Before all that we saw panned out in VII’s opening titles? Even though that’s all still somewhat of a mystery, it’s kinda fun not knowing all the answers in this time and place. But I’m rambling.
So the golden droid’s tale starts out smack-dab in a space battle as Luke and Wedge take on a whole lotta TIEs. It’s truly amazing how Mr. Fry put the dogfight into words. I mean… I’ve tried to write space battles for fanfics. They’re confusing. I write better with characters more than I do with war machines. I have to wonder if any of these great SW authors ever had trouble figuring them out too. I suppose it’s just something that takes time and patience and practice and lots and lots of SW reference books (and probably discussions with the Lucasfilm Story Group would help). But boy oh boy did I learn a lot in just this first chapter alone. Not only is it an exciting opener, but it makes sense for dumb readers like me. Even with all that X-wing jargon I had to learn all the while. I didn’t know they used the terms “port” and “starboard”! Small thing but still cool to know. And wow there are so many ways to describe laserfire and explosions without reusing the same words over and over again! Reading this book was a lesson in Star Warsian vocabulary for sure, as well as a lesson in Star Warsian warfare, Star Warsian technology, and Star Warsian culture. I feel smarter already! I suppose this all sounds dumb to those of you more-seasoned SW fans, but *points to blog site title* I’m still learnin’.
Yeah no doubt Jason Fry knows how to write the wars in the Star Wars, but he equally knows how to write for the stars in Star Wars, too. I am absolutely amazed how well he wrote for Luke. We spend the majority of the book in Luke’s head and it is a mind-blowing feeling. And it’s a great place in time to be there! Just fresh off destroying the Death Star, Luke’s simply trying to be the best Rebel he can be, but this little thing called the Force keeps throwing him off. We learn so much from his perspective it’s astounding. One of my favorite things we get to dig into were those little moments that we didn’t see in the movie. I know I’ve been pretty shortsighted and somehow assumed everything that happens in the films happened somewhere between two hours and two days. Luke recalls a number of times Obi-Wan trained him and gave him nuggets of Jedi wisdom in the days between “Hello there” and “If you strike me down…”. It blew my mind wide open knowing about these parts of the story we didn’t know, and of course, it further reminded me what an amazing person Ben Kenobi is (even though I certainly already knew that). Even knowing just the smallest things, like how very hurt Luke was after Owen and Beru’s death, brings new meaning and understanding to the character and his overall story. From the film, we gather that Owen and Beru care for him, but it also seems that their relationship with Luke was sometimes difficult. Knowing he wrestled with anger and grief over what happened to them says that there was so much more to their relationship that we didn’t know. That clearly, Luke loved them, even when they didn’t get along, and Owen and Beru must’ve loved him too. They were his only family, man… OMG I’m sorry I can’t believe I spent so long on that topic but wow it’s really kinda incredible to think about. *Curls into a ball and cries for Luke* Not to mention seeing how much respect Luke has for his father in this chapter in history. We all know his dad isn’t exactly all that honorable at this point, but seeing him still having this connection with him, even not having ever known him, is all kinds of feelsy :3
Of course, one of the biggest things we really get to dig into in this story is the Force. It’s the kickstater for the whole adventure as Luke finds himself led by the Force to the ruins of a Jedi temple on Devaron. For those of us wondering how it is Luke knew how to use a lightsaber as well as he did in Episode V… this is how. With a few words from Ben and a trio of training remotes and a whole whole lot of patience, Luke gets pretty good at the Jedi-ing by the end of the book 🙂 One of the things I love most about SW books is getting a first-person view of the Force, when an author eloquently paints a mental picture of what it’s like to be surrounded by it, working with it, feeling it… it’s a beautiful thing. And Mr. Fry’s work here is no exception. He just absolutely brings it to life in the most spectacular, poetic manner! Watching Luke gain a better understanding of the Force through every twist and turn is amazing. His training session puts him through a lot both physically and emotionally, with descriptions so amazingly vivid you pretty much feel all those moments of frustration and victory yourself (I know I was pretty exhausted just reading all of his lessons in lightsaber-deflecting). Oh gracious everything about it’s fantastic. I wish I could get my thoughts in better order on all of this, but really you just have to read the book for yourself. Can I just say again that it’s seriously amazing spending time in Luke’s head? All the other SW books I’ve read have bounced back and forth between various characters’ perspectives, but 90% of Weapon Of A Jedi focuses on young Skywalker. It’s different, but a really really cool kind of different. I feel like I know this guy even better than I did before. I don’t think there could possibly been a better book to start with for my first canon novel in the Original Trilogy era. Seriously. Like wow. It all leads up to one awesome duel between Luke and an unexpected foe wielding an electrostaff that is all kinds of edge-of-your-seat. Lol I’m not sure if I’m writing this with spoilers in mind or not anymore. But anyhow this book was truly one of the most epic and wonderful things I’ve ever read. It’s a perfect balance between action and heart, and quite honestly should be read by every Star Wars fan, young and old. Jason Fry’s clearly a master at writing Star Wars stuff and I will definitely have to hunt down some of his other novels. And I certainly can’t wait to dive into the other novels in the Journey To The Force Awakens and see what Han and Leia were doing too 😀
So I’m glad we got to sit down and talk about The Weapon Of A Jedi for a moment. But before I sign off…

FIVE OTHER THINGS I LEARNED FROM THIS BOOK, OR JUST FOUND PLAIN INTERESTING OR WORTH MENTIONING!
1. Getting “spacesick” is a thing.
2. Y-Wings are none too fast.
3. Luke’s acting skills are terrible, but in a rather adorable way XD
4. Screwdrivers exist in the SW galaxy.
5. Luke spends a loooooooot of moneyyyy in this book.

OK now we’re done. See you next month for another Star Wars Summer Read!

Keep The Peace,
– Twilight